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ScienceDaily - Organic Chemistry News

Organic Chemistry in the News. Organic compounds, protein engineering, and more. Read all the latest research in the field of organic chemistry. Full-text with images. Free.
  • Antioxidant biomaterial promotes healing

    The first-ever inherently antioxidant biomaterial has been created by researcher. It has the potential to prevent failure in medical devices and Connect Error:Too many connectionsdb error surgical implants. The lead researcher said the new biomaterial could be used to create scaffolds for tissue engineering, coat or build safer medical devices, promote healing in regenerative medicine, and protect cells, genes, and viruses during drug delivery. He added that the new biomaterial is easy to make and inexpensive.
  • Atomic structure of key muscle component revealed

    Adding to the growing fundamental understanding of the machinery of muscle cells, a group of biophysicists describe -- in minute detail -- how actin filaments are stabilized at one of their ends to form a basic muscle structure called the sarcomere. With the help of many other proteins, actin molecules polymerize to form filaments that give rise to structures of many different shapes. The actin filaments have a polarity, with a plus and minus end, reflecting their natural tendency to gain or lose subunits when not stabilized.
  • Cost-effective, solvothermal synthesis of heteroatom (S or N)-doped graphene developed

    A research team has developed cost-effective technology to synthesize sulfur-doped and nitrogen-doped graphenes which can be applied as high performance electrodes for secondary batteries and fuel cells.
  • Dream come true for chemists? Creating organic zeolites

    Traditionally, zeolites have been derived from inorganic material like silicon or aluminum. For the past several years, one research team has focused on combining zeolites with organic polymers whose main component is carbon, oxygen, hydrogen or nitrogen. A new technique and the new materials it produces can be immediately useful in catalysis and separations for chemicals production and hydrocarbon conversion for energy applications.
  • Chemist develops X-ray vision for quality assurance

    A researcher has developed a method that uses X-rays for the rapid identification of substances present in an indeterminate powder. The new technique has the capacity to recognize advanced biological molecules such as proteins. The method therefore has enormous potential in both food production and the pharmaceutical industry, where it opens up new opportunities for the quality assurance of protein-based medicines, for example.