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ScienceDaily - Organic Chemistry News

Organic Chemistry in the News. Organic compounds, protein engineering, and more. Read all the latest research in the field of organic chemistry. Full-text with images. Free.
  • Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

    Scientists have created a new kind of ion channel based on short carbon nanotubes, which can be inserted into synthetic bilayers and Connect Error:Too many connectionsdb error live cell membranes to form tiny pores that transport water, protons, small ions and DNA. These carbon nanotube "porins" have significant implications for future health care and bioengineering applications.
  • Clean smell doesn't always mean clean air

    Scientists are taking a closer look at aerosol formation involving an organic compound -- called limonene -- that provides the pleasant smell of cleaning products and air fresheners. This research will help to determine what byproducts these sweet-smelling compounds are adding to the air while we are using them to remove germs and odors.
  • Co-opting bacterial immune system to turn off specific genes

    A technique that co-opts an immune system already present in bacteria and archaea to turn off specific genes or sets of genes -- creating a powerful tool for future research on genetics and related fields -- has been developed by researchers. "This should not only expedite scientific discovery, but help us better engineer microbial organisms to further biotechnology and medicine," says a senior author of a paper on the work. "For example, this could help us develop bacterial strains that are more efficient at converting plant biomass into liquid fuels."
  • Scientists' new analysis of plant proteins advances our understanding of photosynthesis

    A world without plants would be a world without oxygen, uninhabitable for us and for many creatures. We know plants release oxygen by absorbing carbon dioxide and breaking down water using sunlight through the process of photosynthesis. However, we know little about the mechanics of how plants create oxygen during photosynthesis. A breakthrough that will help advance our understanding of this critical ecological process was made recently by scientists.
  • 'Sticky' ends start synthetic collagen growth

    Researchers detail how synthetic collagen helices self-assemble into fibers and gels. The discovery could lead to better synthetic materials for medical applications, they say. Collagen is the most common protein in mammals, a major component of bone and the fibrous tissues that support cells and hold organs together. Discovering its secrets may lead to better synthetic collagen for tissue engineering and cosmetic and reconstructive medicine.